:::::::::::: Ekho :::::::::::: Women in Sonic Art

Celebrating the Work of Women within Sonic Art: an expanding archive promoting equality in the sonic field

Month: September, 2014

Sophie Germain – Plate Vibrations

‘Germain (1776-1831) was a French mathematician who studied plate vibrations. She won a prize from the French Academy of Sciences for developing a theory to explain the vibration of flat and curved plates.

Bowing_chladni_plateBowing Chladni Plate

Her biography in the Encyclopedia Britannica notes,she worked on generalizations of her research but, isolated from the academic community on account of her gender and thus largely unaware of new developments taking place in the theory of elasticity, she made little real progress.’ (post c. Trevor Cox

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Sarah Angliss

‘A composer, multi-instrumentalist, roboticist and sound historian. Sarah’s work explores her obsessions with defunct machinery, faded variety acts and European folklore.

Sarah-Angliss-Spacedog-and-Hugo-photo-Gaynor-Perry

Sarah’s music mixes her own software patches (using Max/MSP, Supercollider, PRAAT and other tools) with her samples, field recordings and live performance on theremin, saw, recorder, waterphone, keyboard,  handbells and other instruments. On stage, she’s often accompanied by musical automata – machines she’s been devising and building since 2005 as she’s been seeking a more theatrical alternative to the laptop, sampler and loop pedal.

 

About “The Bows” (SEE BELOW) Angliss says: “This is an interpretation of a London folksong which I hope captures the mood of the original, even though it’s drifted far from its moorings. The bows in the title are the bends in the River Thames but could also refer to bows of a violin. In the original folksong (titled “The Cruel Sister” or “The Bonny Bows”), a woman drowns when she’s pushed into the river by her sister. Downstream, her body is dredged out of the water and her breastbone, fingerbones and hair are used to make a fiddle. Whenever anyone tries to play this fiddle, it speaks, revealing the identity of her murderer. (The Wire)

 

Hard to pigeonhole as an engineer, musician or kinetic artist, Sarah’s actually a little of all three. In fact, she’s been combing these interests since she was a child in the 1970s, building mini cable cars across the garden and put together soundtracks, on a portable Phillips cassette recorder, about futuristic trips to the Moon. Sarah’s first degree in engineering (electroacoustics) was followed by a masters in biologically-inspired robotics (evolutionary and adaptive systems) and an Associateship in Early Music Performance from the Royal College of Music. On graduating as an engineer, Sarah had a brief spell in the building industry, where she assisted the chief acoustician in a busy London engineering company,  There, she fell for the peculiar charms of vintage electronics, when she was asked to work on an ancient, hybrid thermal-modelling computer. She later found her way to the Science Museum, London, where she was encouraged to combine her interests in the history of technology, interactive design and live performance. In 1995, Sarah opted to leave the Science Museum and work independently, focusing on performance, writing and the sonic arts. She worked solo and collaborated with other makers, most notably the sculptor and cartoonist Tim Hunkin who introduced her to PLCs and other control systems for machines.’ (Bio from Sarah’s website)

>>> http://www.sarahangliss.com/ <<<